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putting his foot down. he says no tax hikes for the wealthy, no deal. america hits that fiscal cliff in 27 days and that means tax hikes and deep spending cuts if the democrats and the republicans can't come together in some kind of a deal and with just ten days remaining until congress is scheduled to go home for the holidays, the clock ticking. here's what he told bloomberg news. listen. >> we're going to have to see the rates on the top 2% go up and we're not going to be able it to get a deal without it. >> we start this morning with white house correspondent dan lothian, he's in washington, d.c. okay. so who's got the ball in their court at this point then, dan? >> well, you know, i think the house gop, they have presented their counteroffer which white house spokesman jay carney is referring to as, quote, magic beans and fairy dust. we expect that house republicans will keep putting pressure on the white house to engage, push for more details on what the white house will accept when it comes to additional entitlement cuts. but i think what's unclear is what kind of negotiating is goin
over the fight in the fiscal cliff. americans face crushing tax hikes and severe spending cuts in 27 days if democrats and republicans cannot come together on a deal. by the way, congress breaks for the holidays in ten days. slash that number. in an interview with bloomberg news, the president made it crystal clear he's not about to blink on the issue of tax hikes for the wealthiest americans. >> we'll have to see the rates on the top 2% go up. and we're not going to be able to get a deal without it. >> white house correspondent dan lothian joins us live from washington this morning. very nice to see you, dan. >> good to see you. >> here's the deal. we have republicans pitted against democrats. now we understand there are issues amongst republicans as well. >> that's right. they're in a tough spot here. they don't want to be in left in a position of being blamed for the fiscal cliff. you're seeing a division between house members and senate members. the reason for this is mainly over the 800 billion in new tax revenue. this was part of john boehner and plan. those tea party-backed co
the white house fiscal cliff package. the white house's proposal to avoid the big tax hikes and spending cuts that are going to happen in january, unless something is done. that proposal has come under heavy criticism from republicans who say wasn't serious. how speaker john boehner said he was flabbergasted. mitch mcconnell reportedly laughed out loud and in this debate over reducing the debt, the president is pushing for an additional $255 billion in spending. he wants those higher taxes to spend more, which is leading to some criticism. joining me now is brad blakeman, the former deputy to george w. bush. and chairman of the south carolina democratic party. a deal that is all about the republicans desire to cut back on the debt and deficit -- why would the president be proposing $255 billion in war spending? >> well, he's not. what he is proposing is shifting spending priorities. after those cuts, shifting priorities, and by the way -- this is infrastructure development. this is to make sure that people who have gone the payroll tax relief keep that payroll tax relief and expanding un
if romney didn't win. this fiscal cliff negotiation seems doomed. am i being pessimistic? >> we're basically spending like europeans, but being taxed like americans. at some point you got to decide which you want. basically american government spending now is getting close to norwegian levels. and at that point, you can't have american tax levels. >> brian: what is their level? >> they spend 46% of gdp and people pay that. that's reflected in their taxes. america is basically borrowing $188 million every hour in washington. seven days a week, 24 hours a day, thanksgiving, ramadan, whatever. that gap cannot be closed by sticking to to the rich. >> brian: don't you think the president realizes that or do you think he fully realizes that in. >> oh, yeah, he does. this is the cunning thing. he's going to blame it on the rich, blame it on the republicans. but right now if you're just an average working guy with an average income, your taxes are going to go up because for him -- pour for the president, it's not about the economy. it's about government. it's about the size of government. not the ec
for averting the fiscal cliff. the republican plan seeks $800 billion through tax reform and mandatory spending cuts. the white house said that the republican proposal falls short of what the president wants and cannot be taken seriously. >> we understand they don't agree with everything but we have not seen alternatives for them and they spoke about the need for revenue and that acknowledgment is welcome. but thus far republicann leaders are adament don't believe rates should go up on the top two percent of the american people. the american people disagree. rates have to rise and the republicans need to acknowledge that. >> that's the major difference between the two sides. tax hikes for the rich x. republicans want tax reform and eliminate deductions and closing the loop holes. the president said on twitter, there can't be tax cuts at the rich at the expense of domestic programs. >> the biggest problem with president obama is he is a small-pinded president in big times . he talk about 35-39 that doesn't get us out of debt. >> that is tough rhetoric for senator lindd say graham. the president
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5